New Zealand: Germline / Embryonic

PROHIBITED
Germline gene editing banned at least until more research is completed.

Germline editing is banned in New Zealand under guidelines set by the Health Research Council of New Zealand. As part of the Research Ethics Guidelines, the agency concluded in 2018, “there is insufficient knowledge about the possible consequences, hazards and effects on future generations” of germline gene editing. Implanting genetically modified embryos is also banned by the Human Assisted Reproductive Technology (HART) Act 2004. Although ‘genetically modified’ is not defined in the act, the Royal Society of New Zealand’s gene editing panel considers gene editing genetic modification. There is ongoing discussion among scientists about whether germline gene editing should be allowed.

Therapies

None

Regulatory Timeline

2019: An international group of researchers, including some from New Zealand, call for a global moratorium on clinical uses of germline editing after a Chinese scientist genetically edited embryos during fertility treatments and at least two of those embryos were carried to term.

2017: Royal Society of New Zealand’s gene editing panel releases Gene Editing in a Healthcare Context, which considers the social, cultural, legal and economic implications of gene-editing technologies for New Zealand and summarizes current regulations for human gene editing.

2017: Royal Society of New Zealand creates a gene editing panel to facilitate discourse and research surrounding gene editing technologies.

2004: Advisory Committee on Assisted Reproductive Technology (ACART) established as part of the Human Assisted Reproductive Technology (HART) Act 2004 and is responsible for establishing guidelines for fertility procedures and research. The HART Act prohibits the implantation of genetically modified embryos.

2001: Royal Commission on Genetic Modification calls for the establishment of a bioethics committee to decide whether germline gene therapy should be allowed or banned.

1996: Environmental Protection Authority releases the Hazardous Substances and New Organisms (HSNO) Act 1996, establishing regulations for the creation and release of non-native (including genetically modified) organisms into New Zealand. The Royal Commission on Genetic Modification decides that research involving genetic modification of human cells is also covered by this Act.

Additional Resources

Click on countries (eg. Brazil, US) or regions (eg. European Union) to find what agricultural products or therapies are approved or in development and their regulatory status.

Hotspots Background

EUROPEAN UNION

 

Agricultural Gene Editing
- Crops / Food
- Animals

 

Human Gene Editing
- Therapeutic / Stem Cell
- Germline / Embryonic

 

Gene Drives

 

BRAZIL

 

Agricultural Gene Editing
- Crops / Food
- Animals

 

Human Gene Editing
- Therapeutic / Stem Cell
- Germline / Embryonic

 

Gene Drives

 

NEW ZEALAND

 

Agricultural Gene Editing
- Crops / Food
- Animals

 

Human Gene Editing
- Therapeutic / Stem Cell
- Germline / Embryonic

 

Gene Drives

 

UNITED STATES

 

Agricultural Gene Editing
- Crops / Food
- Animals

 

Human Gene Editing
- Therapeutic / Stem Cell
- Germline / Embryonic

 
 

Gene Drives

 

AUSTRALIA

 

Agricultural Gene Editing
- Crops / Food
- Animals

 

Human Gene Editing
- Therapeutic / Stem Cell
- Germline / Embryonic

 

Gene Drives

 

CANADA

 

Agricultural Gene Editing
- Crops / Food
- Animals

 

Human Gene Editing
- Therapeutic / Stem Cell
- Germline / Embryonic

 
 

Gene Drives